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cornmeal mush

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 



Make a batch of Hasty Pudding (recipe follows) and add 4 tablespoons of flour to the mixture. Whip it in, in a hurry. Pour the mush into an oiled loaf pan and chill overnight. In the morning slice the cold mush
1/4 inch thick and fry in oil, butter, bacon fat, or a mixture of same.

Flour the slices before frying.
Fry it slowly until it takes on a golden and crunchy crust. This will take some time, about 15 minutes on each side.
Serve with butter and maple syrup.
 

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HASTY PUDDING

This dish was an absolute staple in Colonial times. It was called hasty
because it takes only about 40 minutes to make . . . and in terms of
early cooking techniques that was a very short time. It could be pre-
pared quickly and served just with gravy. That was often the whole
meal. Or it could be served as a side vegetable dish. Or the colonists
would sprinkle it with sugar and top with milk for dessert ... or
breakfast. Finally, it could be fried. Hasty pudding saved many a
family in earlier times.
 

 

 

 



6 cups boiling water
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup yellow cornmeal
 

 

 

 

 

 



Bring the water to a rapid boil in a heavy covered pot. Add the salt and slowly add the meal to the boiling water, stirring all the time.  use a wire whisk for this. Continue stirring until the cornmeal thickens, about 5 minutes. Turn the heat down low and cover the pot. Continue to simmer lightly, stirring the pudding several times, for 30
minutes more.
 

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BAKED POLENTA
 

This recipe illustrates an interesting bit of history. Corn came from the New World and was taken to Italy. Our beloved cornmeal mush became known as polenta in Italy, and while in Italy Mr. Jefferson learned a new trick. He brought this recipe back with him and evidently served it often at the plantation.

 

 

 

 

1 cup grated Parmesan or Romano cheese
1 quart water
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup polenta
1/2 stick, 1/8 pound, butter,melted,
 

 

 

 

 

Bring the water to a boil. Add the salt and slowly stir in the polenta.
Stir constantly to avoid lumps.
After the mixture begins to thicken
you can stir less frequently.
Simmer for about 20 minutes or until very
thick.
Pour into a greased loaf mold or bread pan. Allow to cool in the refrigerator overnight.
Cut into 1/4-inch slices and layer like tiles in a baking dish.
Pour the butter over the top and then the cheese. Bake in 375 oven for about 20 minutes, or until the cheese is melted and all begins to brown just a bit.
 

 

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